Bighorn Crags

The Bighorn Crags are described on pages 122 to126 and there is an access map on page 143. The Bighorn Crags form a distinctive, high-granite divide more than 20 miles in length which towers nearlyh 1,000 feet above the surrounding mountains. The Bighorn Crags offer many excellent challenges to mountaineers and a surprising amount of good rock to challenge rock … Continue reading

Peak 9100

This formation/peak is not in the book specifically but is discussed as part of the Cathedral’s Cemetery climbing area. I climbed this formation in 1984 with Paul Belamy and Dana Hansen. I am not sure if it was a first ascent. We did not see evidence of other climbers but I know this area was worked over by members of … Continue reading

Peak 9140

This formation/peak is not in the book specifically but is discussed as part of the Cathedral’s Cemetery climbing area. I climbed this formation in 1984 with Paul Belamy and Dana Hansen. I am not sure if it was a first ascent. We did not see evidence of other climbers but I know this area was worked over by members of … Continue reading

Litner Peak/Litner Group

This peak is found on page 123. Litner Peak is the highest point in the Litner Group; it is located at the west end of Ship Island Lake [Approach: (H)(4.12)(c) and (d)]. Little is known about the route; the first ascent was by L. Hales and P. Schoening, in 1955. As you will see from the two photos below, the … Continue reading

Heart Peak

Route information for this peak is found on page 126. Heart Mountain is a seldom climbed peak in the Bighorn Crags. I’ve only looked at it from across the valley but it looks to have good granite lines on it’s north face. … Continue reading

Ramskull Peak

This peak is found on pages 125 and 126. This peak towers above Harbor and Wilson Lakes. The easiest route on this peak climbs up steeply from its west ridge with poor opportunities to set protection. I do not know of any attempts on its eastern or northern faces.   … Continue reading

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