Mountain Peaks: Determining the True Summit and the True Elevation by Livingston Douglas

Mountain climbers and obsessive peak-baggers have a common goal: to stand atop a specific mountain or series of mountains. It is generally accepted that you must stand on the highest point of a mountain to claim a successful ascent. Thankfully, about 95% of the time, there is no dispute as to the mountain top’s exact location (true summit) and its … Continue reading

A Sawtooth Range Glacier

The clipping file that I examined contained the following article. Unfortunately, there is no date on the clipping or any indication within the text as to the timeframe when it was written. My guess is that the article dates from the 1920s or earlier. In 2018 we know there are no active glaciers in Idaho. Pettit Lake is the only … Continue reading

Castle Peak and Molybdenum

Castle Peak from Peak 10405.

In the 1960s the American Smelting and Refining Company was preparing to develop an open pit molybdenum mine on the north side of Castle Peak. The remnants of the company’s extensive mining camp are still standing below the peak. There is a good summary of the dispute on the Boulder White Clouds Council’s website: The Battle for Castle Peak. This … Continue reading

1938 Account of a Borah Ascent.

The following article was published in the Salt Lake Tribune.  Tribune Intermountain Service. September 25, 1938 TWIN FALLS, Idaho—Climbing Mount Borah, Idaho’s’ highest peak, is like walking a tight rope for at least a quarter of a mile with nothing underneath you on either side and only lose rock shale in the middle. That is the warning issued by Walter … Continue reading

1948 Idaho Statesman Article: Here’s a Club for You to Join But It’s A Rough Organization

[Editor’s Note: This September 13, 1948 article was referenced in the book in the Mountaineering History Section on page 18. The name “Thatuna Hills” appears in the article. This name which was not adopted by later map makers refers to a western extension of the Bitterroot Mountains that now is considered the northern Clearwater Mountains.] By JACK ANDERSON  Wanna join … Continue reading