The Missing Link: Norman Clyde in Idaho

Idaho is a virtual sea of mountains. While there is no doubt that Native Americans rambled across the state’s mountain summits and that explorers, trappers, miners, ranchers, surveyors and locals were climbing Idaho’s mountains from the time Lewis and Clark first passed through the state, there are few recorded accounts of these early ascents. When I wrote, Idaho: A Climbing … Continue reading

Appendicitis Hill and T.M. Bannon

T.M. Bannon. USGS Photo

On February 26th, 1926, the Sunday Idaho Statesman published the following report by E.S. Crawford describing the origin of the name Appendicitis Mountain, now Appendicitis Hill. [Bannon’s extensive surveying contributions to Idaho Surveying are discussed on pages 14 and 15.] Appendicitis Case – Responsible for Mountain’s Name Answering a query of The statesman several weeks ago as to how “Appendicitis Mountain” … Continue reading

An Overview of the Lookouts on the Salmon National Forest by Bing Young, 1982

The Blue Nose lookout is unlocked and in need of some serious repair work.

According to A History of the Salmon National Forest, by 1916 there were two lookouts on the SNF, at Blue Nose and Salmon City Peak (later given the name “Baldy“). It was assumed that most of the forest could be seen from these two points. Cathedral Rock, in the Bighorn Crags, was also used at times to see the Middle … Continue reading

A Sawtooth Range Glacier

This article from the Idaho Statesman was published August 1,1926.. In 2018 we know there are no active glaciers in Idaho. Pettit Lake is the only landmark mentioned in the article so it is safe to assume that the glacier was located west of the lake. Based on the distance and size measurements set forth in the article as well … Continue reading

Which Idaho Peak is the tallest?

In the early 1920s, Hyndman Peak was considered Idaho’s highest summit. After an article (not yet located) in the Idaho Statesman declared Hyndman the tallest, a protest was sent to the Statesman and subsequently published by the paper. The protest, set out below, declared Patterson Peak in the White Clouds as the highest Idaho summit and claimed it was 13,000 feet high. Patterson … Continue reading