T.M. Bannon by Rick Baugher

T.M. Bannon. USGS Photo

Thomas M. Bannon was also a self-taught mountaineer. Although his name is not widely known in mountaineering circles, during his surveying career from 1889 to 1917 he climbed nearly one thousand summits in the American West. More than two hundred of these summits were in Idaho. Bannon’s cryptic reports, supplemented by the rock Cairns, Wooden triangulation signals, chiseled cross-reference marks; … Continue reading

The First Ascent of Triple Peak

The second edition of the book discussed the then unnamed Triple Peak as follows: Peak 11280+                                                               11,280+ feet (Rating unknown)  This complicated tower, the southernmost summit on the Corruption/Breitenbach … Continue reading

Appendicitis Hill and T.M. Bannon

Appendicitis Hill as viewed from the south. Livingston Douglas Photo

On February 26th, 1926, the Sunday Idaho Statesman published the following report by E.S. Crawford describing the origin of the name Appendicitis Mountain, now Appendicitis Hill. Bannon’s extensive surveying contributions to Idaho Surveying are discussed on Pages 14 and 15 of the book. Appendicitis Case – Responsible for Mountain’s Name Answering a query of The Statesman several weeks ago as … Continue reading

Climbing the Slopes of Mount Borah—the Dean of Idaho Peaks

Editor’s note: This article from The Idaho Statesman (February 10, 1935) was written by Lyman Marden, one of the participants in the 1934 USGS mapping of the 15-minute Mount Borah quadrangle.  The Idaho Statesman (February 10, 1935). By Lyman Marden  During the season of 1934, the United States Geological Survey began the mapping of the Borah Peak quadrangle that includes … Continue reading

1948 Idaho Statesman Article: Here’s a Club for You to Join But It’s A Rough Organization

[Editor’s Note: This September 13, 1948 article was referenced on Page 18 of the book in the Mountaineering History Section. The name “Thatuna Hills” appears in the article. This name, which was not adopted by later map makers, refers to a western extension of the Bitterroot Mountains that now is considered the Northern Clearwater Mountains.] By Jack Anderson  Wanna join … Continue reading