Climbing the Slopes of Mount Borah—the Dean of Idaho Peaks

Editor’s note: This article from The Idaho Statesman, February 10, 1935 was written by Lyman Marden one of the participants in the 1934 USGS mapping of the 15 minute Mount Borah quadrangle.  The Idaho Statesman, February 10, 1935 By LYMAN MARDEN  DURING the season of 1934 the United States geological survey began the mapping of the Borah peak quadrangle that includes … Continue reading

1948 Idaho Statesman Article: Here’s a Club for You to Join But It’s A Rough Organization

[Editor’s Note: This September 13, 1948 article was referenced in the book in the Mountaineering History Section on page 18. The name “Thatuna Hills” appears in the article. This name which was not adopted by later map makers refers to a western extension of the Bitterroot Mountains that now is considered the northern Clearwater Mountains.] By JACK ANDERSON  Wanna join … Continue reading

Iowa Mountaineers

Photo courtesy of the Iowamountaineers.blogspot.

The Iowa Mountaineers climbing club was a major player in the in early Sawtooth Range exploration. The club was founded by John and Ede Ebert in 1940, as a University of Iowa Mountaineering Club. The club later incorporated as a not for profit Iowa corporation and became a major force in sponsoring climber education and expeditions throughout the world. Schwartz … Continue reading

Chuck Ferguson by Rick Baugher

Chuck Ferguson (L) and David Ferguson (R) in Jones Creek, Lost River Range, after climbing No Regret Peak July of 1994. Rick Baugher Photo

(1940 to 1998) The late Chuck Ferguson is not as well known as one would expect considering his accomplishments as an Idaho climber with a peak, at least unofficially named after him. I met Chuck in the early ’80’s during my working at the Idaho Falls YMCA. I was organizing community fun runs in Idaho Falls and Chuck ran in … Continue reading

Where Do Mountain Names Come From?

The history, evolution, and process of naming mountains is discussed in the book on pages 32 and 33. However, the specific origin of official (and unofficial) mountain names is often not documented. The public can submit proposed names for peaks via the U.S. Geological Survey’s U.S. Board on Geographic Names website. But often, and especially before the internet, names that were not officially designated through … Continue reading