Mount Borah: Dirty Traverse and Northeast Ridge Variation – East Face by Bob Boyles

Bob Boyles provided the following history and, with Wes Collins, the route descriptions (below) for these two East Face routes. I first visited the eastern side of the Lost River Range (The Pahsimeroi Valley) in 1972, while working on a helicopter contract for the Forest Service. Flying through the range provided me a view that few ever get to see. … Continue reading

1987 Death on Borah

In 1987 an experienced climber descending Borah fell on the snowpack and lost control of his self-arrest. He landed just above a water chute/water-melt tunnel as the avalanche he triggered pushed him into the chute and buried him. Water Chutes/Water-Melt Tunnels When temperatures warm, water melts below the snow surface and flows in river-like patterns downhill. As the water flows, … Continue reading

Lyman Marden

Lyman Marden was a member of the USGS team that surveyed the Borah Peak quadrangle. He wrote an article entitled Climbing the Slopes of Mount Borah—the Dean of Idaho Peaks about the survey. This article appeared in the Idaho Statesman in 1935. In 195, he wrote the following report for the Boise Public Library. —An account given to the Boise Public Library … Continue reading

Lee Morrison

Lee Morrison leading his survey crew across Chicken Out Ridge on Mount Borah. Lyman Marden Photo

Lee Morrison, was a USGS topographic engineer, who led many mapping expedition in Idaho in the 1920s and 1930s. He announced in 1929 that his calculations had identified an unnamed peak in the Pahsimeroi mountains of the Lost River Range as being much higher than Mount Hyndman. The peak was soon there after named Borah Peak aka Mount Borah. In the … Continue reading

A 1949 Climb Up Borah

The Northwest Ridge is in the center of the photo. This ridge branches into two separate ridges lower down on the mountain, one into the Rock Creek drainage and the other forms the edge of the West Face. The Southwest (Chicken-Out) Ridge is on the right skyline. Photo by John Platt

This article was published in the Aberdeen Times August 18, 1949.Since 1940, only 62 people have climbed Mount Borah, Idaho’s tallest mountain. Among these are four amateur mountain climbers from Aberdeen who scaled the 12,655-foot peak last Monday morning. Stanley and Horace Nealey, Howard Morton, and Norman Brown put on a good pair of shoes last Saturday afternoon and drove to the … Continue reading

1929 Borah Declared Idaho’s Highest Peak

The book discusses the discovery of Borah Peak as the highest point in Idaho on pages 16 and 17. This entry expands on that discussion and adds source documents relating to the issue as well as documentation for T.M. Bannon’s first ascent in 1912. The following 1929 article from Idaho Statesman declared to the world that Borah Peak, also known … Continue reading