FIFTY YEARS OF SAWTOOTH CLIMBING 1934-1984 By Dave Bingham

The Elephants Perch from Braxon Peak

When Robert and Miriam Underhill first gazed from the top of Galena Summit in Idaho’s Sawtooth Wilderness, before them stretched a wild mountain panorama never before seen by mountaineers. It was 1934 and in those days the road past the future site of Sun Valley to the summit was little more than a rutted sheep wagon track. Approaching the remote … Continue reading

Leading a Cat by Its Tail by Miriam E Underhill

Courtesy of the Adventure Journal.

Editors Note: Appalachia Vol. 20, 1934. This article put the Sawtooth Range in the national spotlight. Use this link to learn more about the author: Miriam Underhill  There is a bit of page 188 text missing at this point. I will add it as soon as possible. … Continue reading

1938–Ski Mountaineering Sun Valley Style

This December 4, 1938  Idaho Statesman published a Sun Valley promotional article written by the resort’s manager which discussed Ski Mountaineering opportunities in the mountains surrounding the resort. The article predates the publishing of Andy Henning’s definitive guidebook for backcountry skiing around the resort, the Sun Valley Ski Guide in 1948. As lift skiing gained popularity and adherents the resort abandoned … Continue reading

An Overview of the Lookouts on the Salmon National Forest by Bing Young, 1982

The Blue Nose lookout is unlocked and in need of some serious repair work.

According to A History of the Salmon National Forest, by 1916 there were two lookouts on the SNF, at Blue Nose and Salmon City Peak (later given the name “Baldy“). It was assumed that most of the forest could be seen from these two points. Cathedral Rock, in the Bighorn Crags, was also used at times to see the Middle … Continue reading

Lee Morrison

Lee Morrison leading his survey crew across Chicken Out Ridge on Mount Borah. Lyman Marden Photo

Lee Morrison, was a USGS topographic engineer, who led many mapping expedition in Idaho in the 1920s and 1930s. He announced in 1929 that his calculations had identified an unnamed peak in the Pahsimeroi mountains of the Lost River Range as being much higher than Mount Hyndman. The peak was soon there after named Borah Peak aka Mount Borah. In the … Continue reading

1938 Account of a Borah Ascent.

The following article was published in the Salt Lake Tribune.  Tribune Intermountain Service. September 25, 1938 TWIN FALLS, Idaho—Climbing Mount Borah, Idaho’s’ highest peak, is like walking a tight rope for at least a quarter of a mile with nothing underneath you on either side and only lose rock shale in the middle. That is the warning issued by Walter … Continue reading