An Overview of the Lookouts on the Salmon National Forest by Bing Young, 1982

Blue Nose Lookout. Luke Chandler Photo

According to A History of the Salmon National Forest, by 1916 there were two lookouts on the SNF, at Blue Nose and Salmon City Peak (later given the name “Baldy”). It was assumed that most of the forest could be seen from these two points. Cathedral Rock, in the Bighorn Crags, was also used at times to see the Middle … Continue reading

A 1949 Climb Up Borah

The Northwest Ridge is in the center of the photo. This ridge branches into two separate ridges lower down on the mountain, one into the Rock Creek drainage and the other forms the edge of the West Face. The Southwest (Chicken-Out) Ridge is on the right skyline. Photo by John Platt

This article was published in the Aberdeen Times August 18, 1949.Since 1940, only 62 people have climbed Mount Borah, Idaho’s tallest mountain. Among these are four amateur mountain climbers from Aberdeen who scaled the 12,655-foot peak last Monday morning. Stanley and Horace Nealey, Howard Morton, and Norman Brown put on a good pair of shoes last Saturday afternoon and drove to the … Continue reading

1948 Idaho Statesman Article: Here’s a Club for You to Join But It’s A Rough Organization

[Editor’s Note: This September 13, 1948 article was referenced in the book in the Mountaineering History Section on page 18. The name “Thatuna Hills” appears in the article. This name which was not adopted by later map makers refers to a western extension of the Bitterroot Mountains that now is considered the northern Clearwater Mountains.] By JACK ANDERSON  Wanna join … Continue reading

Where Do Mountain Names Come From?

The history, evolution, and process of naming mountains is discussed in the book on pages 32 and 33. However, the specific origin of official (and unofficial) mountain names is often not documented. The public can submit proposed names for peaks via the U.S. Geological Survey’s U.S. Board on Geographic Names website. But often, and especially before the internet, names that were not officially designated through … Continue reading