Andromeda

Elevation: 11,620 ft
Prominence: 360

This peak is not in the book. Judi Steciak, Carl Hamke and Derek Percoski have provided the route information found below. Also, use the link below to read Rick Baugher’s trip report. Updated August 2019


Andromeda Is located on the rugged ridge line that includes Pegasus and Altair peaks. Pegasus sits in between these two. USGS Standhope Peak

Andromeda taken from Pyramid Peak. The picture shows the east face. Vanessa LeBarre Raela Photo

Andromeda taken from Pyramid Peak. The picture shows the east face. Vanessa LeBarre Raela Photo

Access

Left Fork of Fall Creek. [(C)(3.1)(a) page 260]

Surprise Valley. [(C)(2)(a) page 260]

South Face, Class 3 by Judi Steciak and Carl Hamke

Andromeda is located just less than a mile north of Altair Peak. Ascend the south face from the Left Fork of Fall Creek. The route up the face threads through slabs and cliffs to easier slopes and the narrow summit ridge.  It is also possible to climb towards the saddle between the two peaks and follow the east side of the south ridge to the summit. One of Rick Baugher’s signature film-cans was found on the summit, but moisture had made the paper record illegible.

West Face. Class 3

Hike up Surprise Valley until you’re directly in line with the summit. [Alternately, you reach this point from the Broad Canyon Trailhead, by taking the trail up and over the Altair/Standhope saddle.] This would be difficult to tell without a modern gadget, so if you’re not using one I’d advise bringing the route photo. Ascend the gully directly up the west face as shown in Photo 1.

Derek Percoski Photo.

Derek Percoski Photo.

At the fork I chose to go right (red line) and do more scrambling. The most difficult spots I encountered involved committing to a 5-foot ledge. Around 11,200’ I chose to veer south for a more direct path to the summit, but you could also proceed to the top of the gully and work your way to the summit from there.

Going left at the fork (blue line in Photo 1) would continue on the Class 2+ type terrain, and once you reached the ridge crest you would have to downclimb a bit to skirt around the east side of a tower as shown in Photo 2.

Derek Percoski Photo

Derek Percoski Photo

The West Face route of Andromeda is 15 miles with 4700′ gain as an out-and-back. The loop shown in the below was 16 miles 5500′ gain.

Derek Percoski GPS track for his traverse of Andromeda and Pegasus. This loop entails 7.5 miles one way and 4700’ gain.

Derek Percoski GPS track for his traverse of Andromeda and Pegasus. This loop entails 7.5 miles one way and 4700’ gain.

Additional Notes by Derek Percoski.

In my opinion the west face of Andromeda is the best way to climb that peak. Solid rock, nothing sketchy, and cuts off two miles each way (compared to the south face route). It’s also a great opportunity to make a loop and experience more of the area, by approaching from Surprise Valley and exiting via Left Fork Fall Creek.

In August 2019, I traversed between Andromeda and Pegasus Peak using to opposing faces rather than the ridge. The routes I used to connect the peaks were nothing special, butit’s doable for a climber willing to make a long day out if it.

North Face, Class 3 by Derek Percoski

The north face of Andromeda is passable just east of the north ridge, though the route involves a lot of loose dirt and is not recommended for an ascent path. The remainder of the north face provides solid rock but is of unknown difficulty.

Additional Notes by Derek Percoski

In August 2019, I traversed between Andromeda and Pegasus Peak. Of The route I used to connect the peaks were nothing special, but I think the west face of Andromeda is the best way to climb that peak. Solid rock, nothing sketchy, and cuts off two miles each way. It’s also a great opportunity to make a loop and experience more of the area, by approaching from Surprise Valley and exiting via Left Fork Fall Creek.

 

Climber Trip Reports

Mountain Range: Pioneer Mountains

Longitude: -114.00939   Latitude: 43.80329

Photos:

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