Boulder Peak

Elevation: 10,981 ft
Prominence: 401

Climbing and access information for Boulder Peak is found on page 236. In addition to the routes found in the book Livingston Douglas has provided a route description for his Class 4 South Ridge/Southwest Couloir Route descent route which is set out below.


While not the tallest Boulder Mountain Peak, it is the most visible. Boulder Mountain thrusts out from the main crest and dominates the view from ID-75 to its southwest. Use the link below to read Larry Prescott’s 2016 trip report.

Boulder Peak's south ridge. The towers in the center of the photo are the ones that block progress up the ridge as described in the book.

Boulder Peak’s south ridge. The towers in the center of the photo are the ones that block progress up the ridge as described in the book.

This shot was taken on Boulder Peak's north ridge route.

This shot was taken on Boulder Peak’s north ridge route.

Boulder Peak from Boulder Basin Peak.

Boulder Peak from Boulder Basin Peak.

Boulder Peak from the north.

Boulder Peak from the north near the summit of Boulder Basin Peak..

Boulder Peak viewed from Lorenzo Peak.

Boulder Peak viewed from Lorenzo Peak.

South Ridge/Southwest Couloir Route, Class 4, by Livingston Douglas 

Date of Climb: 8/23/10
Map: Easley Hot Springs

Access

FSR-184 [(A)(8.1)]. This route is part of a climb of Peak 11041/Boulder Basin Peak via its West Face/South Ridge (Class 3) and a ridge traverse to Boulder Peak via the Northwest Ridge (Class 4) of Boulder Peak.

Route

This is the final leg of a loop route that included a climb of Peak 11041/Boulder Basin Peak and Boulder Peak. It is the descent route that I took from the summit of Boulder Peak down to the end of FSR-184 [(A)(8.1)]. Consequently, the route is described as a descent. It was intended to be an easier descent route than the standard South Ridge Route on Boulder Peak, which I had climbed and descended back in 2006.

From the summit of Boulder Peak, descend the South Ridge on a climber’s trail to a large ridge tower (“upper tower”) at approximately 10,300 feet. Skirt the east side of this tower on exposed ledges to reach a minor saddle between the “upper tower” and a “lower tower” at about 10,200 feet. At this saddle between the two towers, there is a prominent couloir that reaches all the way to the ridge from the west side. This couloir descends southwest from the ridge and is clearly visible on the Easley Hot Springs quadrangle.

Leave the South Ridge and descend the Southwest Couloir. Initially, the couloir is loose gravel/scree. The scree becomes more stable as the couloir steepens and narrows. Eventually, the couloir becomes solid rock but presents possible cliffs between it and the valley floor. The couloir requires down-climbing on Class 4 ledges and other face rock to reach the scree field at the base of the couloir. From the base of the couloir, descend scree fields on the east side of West Fork Boulder Creek to reach FSR-184 and the parking area.

Mountain Range: Boulder Mountains

Year Climbed: 1992

First Ascent Information:

  • Other First Ascent: South Ridge/Southwest Couloir Route—Descent
  • Year: 2010
  • Season: Summer
  • Party: Livingston Douglas
  •  
  • Other First Ascent: South Ridge/Southwest Couloir Route—Descent
  • Year:
  • Season: Spring
  • Party:

Longitude: -114.5182   Latitude: 43.8326

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