Kinport Peak

Elevation: 7,222 ft
Prominence: 362

Climbing and access information for peak is found on pages 355 and 356. There is a lot of additional information set out below. First up is Steve Mandella’s photo essay documenting his 2010 climb. Second, is Livingston Douglas 2018 report. Finally, you will find an historical photo at the bottom of the page. Updated October 2018


Kinport Peak is close to Pocatello and is a popular ascent early in the season. Steve Mandella provided the following trip report, which provides an alternative route from the one listed in the book.


Steve Mandella 2010 Update

Kinport is normally accessed from one of the two City Creek trailheads (upper or lower). I chose the upper on this hike. It takes a few hundred feet of elevation off the vertical climb. I also made a loop and connected a few other no-name high points together. I jogged a bit of the downhill and was charged by a moose in the treed section!  Round trip was 9.2 miles with 2,574 feet of elevation gain. Most people take the City Creek Road up to about 6,400 feet and then follow the northeast ridge to the summit. This route is usually free of snow by April/May.

Steve Mandella's GPS track.

Steve Mandella’s GPS track.

USGS Topo: Pocatello South

Below are Steve Mandella’s Photos from the loop.

The Upper City Creek trailhead with Kinport Peak in the background. Steve Mandella Photo

The Upper City Creek trailhead with Kinport Peak in the background. Steve Mandella Photo

City Creek Road takes you most of the way. Steve Mandella Photo

City Creek Road takes you most of the way. Steve Mandella Photo

Kinport Peak above City Creek. Steve Mandella Photo

Kinport Peak above City Creek. Steve Mandella Photo

The summit. Steve Mandella Photo

The summit. Steve Mandella Photo

The route down. Steve jogged part of the descent. Steve Mandella Photo

The route down. Steve jogged part of the descent. Steve Mandella Photo

Steve had an encounter with a moose on the descent which included a bluff charge. Steve Mandella Photo

Steve had an encounter with a moose on the descent, which included a bluff charge. Steve Mandella Photo

The end of the loop.,Steve Mandella Photo

The end of the loop. Steve Mandella Photo


Livingston Douglas 2018 Update

The “Pocatello Greenbelt Trailhead” referred to in the book is now called the “City Creek Management Area”. Use either Center Street or Benton Street to reach Lincoln Avenue. Drive SE on Lincoln Avenue until it ends at a street junction/stop sign. This is City Creek Road. Turn LEFT here and drive 0.4 miles to the trailhead parking area. The elevation at this parking area is 4,805 feet.

Passenger vehicles can drive another ¾ mile (up Kinport Road) to two other, small pullout parking areas near its junction with the North Fork Road. You can drive another 1.4 miles up Kinport Road to a sharp left turn. At this point, the road becomes a rough, 4WD high-clearance road. There is a parking pullout for only one vehicle here.

The current City Creek Management Area Trails Map is linked Here. You should have it with you if you plan to hike up Kinport Peak or Wild Horse Mountain. By the way, the book refers to nearby “Wild Mountain” on Page 356. The mountain’s correct name is Wild Horse Mountain, as per the NFS map. Both the USGS topo map and the book are incorrect on this matter.

The summit of Kinport Peak is interesting. There are a couple of radio antennas on top. But the interesting part is that the high point is NOT the 7,222-foot NORTH SUMMIT. This is obvious when you reach the [larger] SOUTH SUMMIT area which has 2-3 antennas. The SOUTH SUMMIT has an open area of boulders that, I believe, is the high point. I unequivocally KNOW that the NORTH SUMMIT (7,222 feet) is lower than the SOUTH SUMMIT.

Visually, it is obvious that the NORTH SUMMIT is lower (it also has an antenna atop it). The NORTH SUMMIT is a rocky hump whereas the SOUTH SUMMIT is a smoother, gentler “hump”. Mr. Altimeter confirmed my visual inspection. It’s not even close. The NORTH SUMMIT is 20 feet lower in elevation (rounded to the nearest 5 feet). I almost didn’t even bother to drop down to the NORTH SUMMIT until I checked my map and saw that it, apparently, might be the high point. I just wanted to be sure.

Typically, LOJ assigns the true summit to the point with the largest surface area above the highest contour line IF THERE IS NO SPECIFIC ALTITUDE FOR ANY OF THE HIGH POINTS. For Kinport Peak, that is the SOUTH SUMMIT. But since Kinport’s NORTH SUMMIT has a specific measurement (7,222 feet), LOJ awards the high point to the NORTH SUMMIT. LOJ wrongfully assumes, in this case, that the SOUTH SUMMIT is 7,220 feet [the interpolation between the 7,200-foot final contour line and the next higher one (7,240 feet)]. Since 7,222 feet is higher than 7,220 feet (estimated), the NORTH SUMMIT wins. In actuality, the SOUTH SUMMIT elevation is very close to 7,240 feet and exceeds the 7,222-foot elevation of the NORTH SUMMIT.

Here’s another illustration. Oxford Peak has two summits with the same final contour line (9,280 feet). The NORTH SUMMIT of Oxford is measured at 9,282 feet. LOJ assigns the high point for Oxford Peak as the SOUTH SUMMIT because they assume that its elevation is 9,300 feet [(the interpolation between the highest contour line (9,280 feet) and the next higher contour line (9,320 feet)]. That may or may not be true, since it’s only an interpolated estimate.

I am generally a believer that, without a specific measurement, you can’t know if a non-measured summit is higher than a measured summit. But, in the case of Kinport Peak, it’s so visually obvious and is so different (20 feet is a LOT of difference and allows for some error in Mr. Altimeter’s assessment) that there is ZERO DOUBT in my mind that Kinport’s true summit is the [higher] SOUTH SUMMIT area.


An article from the Idaho State Journal. Date unknown.

An article from the Idaho State Journal. Date unknown.

Climber Trip Reports

Mountain Range: Bannock Range

Longitude: -112.48679   Latitude: 42.80829

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