Needles Peak

Elevation: 8,294 ft
Prominence: 394

Needles Peak from the southwest. Three of the granite towers on this peak are visible in this photo. There are a large number of one and two pitch routes on these formation many of which were first climbed by Doug Colwell.

Climbing and access information for this peak is found on pages 115 to 116.


Needles Peak in general is just a big rounded, tree-covered mountain. What makes it special are the granite spires festooning its summit. The highest of these towers forms the summit. This spire is Class 4 by its easiest route.  USGS Gold Fork Rock

Since my first visit to this peak in 1988, Doug Colwell and others have put up dozens of routes on the granite found in this area. You will find plenty of bolts and hangers to protect your climb. Check out the Pins and Needles Climbing Guide to read about the many technical climbing routes in the area.

Needles Peak from the southwest. Three of the granite towers on this peak are visible in this photo. There are a large number of one and two pitch routes on these formation many of which were first climbed by Doug Colwell.

Needles Peak as viewed from the southwest. This photo shows 3 of the granite towers on the peak. There are a large number of 1- and 2-pitch routes on these formations, many of which were first climbed by Doug Colwell.

Needles Peak from Green Mountain. John Platt Photo

Needles Peak as viewed from Green Mountain. John Platt Photo

This formation is the hight point of Needles Peak. Its summit can be reached by a short Class 4 climb.

This formation is the high point of Needles Peak. Its summit can be reached by the short Class 4 climb described in the book.

A climber moving up the Class 4 route to the high point of Needles Peak is located one third of the way up the route.

Dana Hansen moving up the Class 4 route to the high point of Needles Peak. She is roughly one-third of the way up the route. She started by climbing straight up to the left of the tree which is just below her. The route continues on up the ledge she is on to the next tree. It then climbs a slanting open book to a notch. From the notch, you can move onto the west side of the formation and climb a deep, wide crack to the summit.

Needles route

In this photo, I am about to climb between the second tree and the rock to get to the upper third of the route.

Dana Hansen on the summit. The notch described above is in the lower right hand corner of this shot. The final portion of the climb from the notch to the summit is on the back side of the spire .

Dana Hansen on the summit. The notch described above is in the lower right-hand corner of this shot. The final portion of the climb from the notch to the summit is on the back side of the spire.

This is the highest spire viewed from below on its south side. The route described above is on the opposite side of the spire.

This is the highest spire as viewed from below on its South Side. The route described above is on the opposite side of the spire.

This is a portion of the second spire which is south of the high point. There are numerous bolted routes on this formation--many of which were climbed by Doug Colwell.

This is a portion of the second spire which is south of the high point. There are numerous bolted routes on this formation, many of which were climbed by Doug Colwell.

More spires can be found off the summit on the peak's western slope.

More spires can be found off the summit on the peak’s West Slope.

Needles

Needles Peak from a distance.

Needles Peak as viewed from a distance.

The Needles viewed from Needles Summit. John Platt Photo

Needles Peak as viewed from Needles Summit. John Platt Photo

Mountain Range: Western Salmon River Mountains

Year Climbed: 1988

Longitude: -115.82559   Latitude: 44.73409

Photos:

Needles Peak from the southwest. Three of the granite towers on this peak are visible in this photo. There are a large number of one and two pitch routes on these formation many of which were first climbed by Doug Colwell.
Share this post ...Facebooktwitterredditpinterestmail

Comments are closed.