Peak 10179 (Six Lakes Peak)

Elevation: 10,179 ft

This peak is not in the book.


Baugher Couloir  (Class 3/4/5)

Six Lakes Peak is located 1.4 miles north of Washington Peak (pages 226 to 227 in the book) between two scenic lake basins. It is the attractive culmination of a ragged ridge. Although unknown to most climbers, this peak is undoubtedly one of Idaho’s special peaks. Picturesque, rugged, steep sided and without an obvious route, it towers above the surrounding drainages. It is another testament to Rick Baugher’s route finding abilities. Sitting on the summit I had the distinct feeling I was airborne due to the precipitous drop on all sides of this tower.

The peak is best reached from the Fourth of July Road (A)(2). Drive past the trailhead if you have a 4WD. The Fourth of July road ends quickly but to your right you will spot an old mining road that leads toward Phyllis Lake. This road  can be followed south from this point with a 4WD. The road quickly crosses Fourth of July Creek and then rambles up and down to mining works high in the basin in roughly two miles. There are several places where you can park along the road.

Rick Baugher’s 2009 climb up the steep southeast couloir was almost certainly the first ascent of this beauty. Rick chose the name which is appropriate as the peak dominates the Six Lakes Basin.

Peak 10179 from Washington Peak.

Peak 10179 from Washington Peak.

Rick’s route climbed the large couloir that cuts the peak’s southeast face. He reported that most of the route is Class 3 on good rock but an overhanging chockstone mid-route presents an Class 4/5 crux move to surmount. Based on my climb I would rate the climb Class 3/4 with the crux as 4th Class. I would not call it Class 5 because the crux is impossible to protect with a rope and it is only ten feet high. Clearly, many would consider it a Class 5 problem. No matter the subjective rating, the crux will bother many climbers.

This view from the upper part of Six Lakes Basin was taken near the spot we left the road to head toward the peak. The bottom of the basin was easily crossed and there was little downfall above 9,000 feet. Head directly toward the ridge cutting down from left to right turn the ridge on the right to get to the base of the Souteast face.

This view from the upper part of Six Lakes Basin was taken near the spot we left the road to head toward the peak. The bottom of the basin was easily crossed and there was little downfall above 9,000 feet. Head directly toward the ridge cutting down from left to right turn the ridge on the right to get to the base of the Souteast face.

There is a beautiful meadow at the base of the southeast face.

There is a beautiful meadow at the base of the southeast face.

The Baugher Coilor is unmistakable from the meadow. It is roughly 1,100 feet to the summit from the meadow.

The Baugher couloir is unmistakable from the meadow. It is roughly 1,100 feet to the summit from the meadow.

Dan Robbins near the base of the Baugher Coilor.

Dan Robbins near the base of the Baugher couloir.

Dan Robbins in the lower section of the Coilor.

Dan Robbins in the lower section of the couloir.

Dave Pahlas just below the Crux. This is a steep route.

Dave Pahlas just below the Crux. This is a steep route.

Dan Robbins climbing the Crux.

Dan Robbins climbing the Crux.

Dave and Dan above the crux. The Coilor is steeper above the crux and it splits. Either fork will take you to the top. The right hand fork is the most direct route.

Dave and Dan above the crux. The couloir is steeper above the crux and it splits. Either fork will take you to the top. The right hand fork is the most direct route.

Crossing the summit ridge.

Crossing the summit ridge.

This was our route on the descent. We ran into a bit of downfall on this line which crossed an old burn. It was more direct.

This was our route on the descent. We ran into a bit of downfall on this line which crossed an old burn. It was more direct.

The route we followed on the ascent left the road at roughly 9,000 feet. Note that you can drive to near the end of the road with a 4WD and start a bit higher than we did.

The route we followed on the ascent left the road at roughly 9,000 feet. Note that you can drive to near the end of the road with a 4WD and start a bit higher than we did.

Six Lakes Peak from the road.

Six Lakes Peak from the road.

 

Climber Trip Reports

Mountain Range: White Cloud Mountains

Year Climbed: 2015

First Ascent Information:

  • First Ascent Year: 2009
  • Season: Summer
  • Route: SE Couloir (Class 4/5)
  • Party: Rick Baugher.

Longitude: -114.66759   Latitude: 44.02839

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