Peak 9366 (Tater Hill) by Livingston Douglas

Elevation: 9,366 ft
Prominence: 1,306

Peak 9366 as viewed from the summit of Peak 10349. Livingston Douglas Photo

This peak is not in the book. Published December 2019


Peak 9366 is a forested pile of shale that overlooks Tater Creek and the mouth of Tater Canyon. The easiest ascent route is the South Ridge from mouth of Tater Canyon. Beware of timber rattlers in this ideal combination of woods and underlying shale rock. Peak 9366 doesn’t see too many visitors as the nearby higher peaks (e.g., May Mountain, Mogg Mountain) receive much more attention from mountain climbers. The peak makes for a good early-season, snow-free climb. USGS May Mountain

Peak 9366 as viewed from the summit of Peak 10349. Livingston Douglas Photo

Peak 9366 as viewed from the summit of Peak 10349. Livingston Douglas Photo

South Ridge, Class 2

Date of Climb: July 3, 2019

Access

Tater Canyon is accessed either by the Tater Creek BLM Road (if it is still publicly accessible) or via Morse Creek Road and a connecting BLM road (which can be hiked or driven). Morse Creek Road is located 10.2 miles S of US-93 on the [paved] Pahsimeroi Highway. The road is signed and is just N of the hamlet of May, ID. Drive 3.3 miles up Morse Creek Road to an unsigned junction. Go L/N onto a jeep road, pass through a cattle fence, and hike/drive 1-1/2 miles to a hilltop that overlooks the mouth of Tater Canyon. Park here. Follow a cattle trail diagonally down to Tater Creek.

The Tater Creek BLM Road is located about 9.3 miles S of US-93 on the Pahsimeroi Highway. This turnoff is about 1.0 miles N of the hamlet of May, ID. The Tater Creek BLM Road leaves the Pahsimeroi Highway at a sharp turn in the highway. Drive up Tater Creek road to its end at the mouth of Tater Canyon and park.

The Climb

From the mouth of Tater Canyon (5,900 feet), cross to the N side of Tater Creek and begin a sagebrush bushwhack N then NE then N up to the pine forest at 7,700 feet. The terrain is open sagebrush/scrub with a shale scree base. You may find an occasional game trail to help you get through the sagebrush. The pine forest is delightful at first but has a fair amount of blowdown in steeper areas and some areas of loose scree.

Higher up the rounded South Ridge, the pine trees thin out and the climb becomes a scramble up steep, exhausting shale scree/talus with scattered trees and blowdown. Peak 9366 is essentially a massive hump of shale scree/talus with some scattered pines. The slope steepens at 8,300 feet and the ridge bends R-ish/NE at 8,600 feet. The final 900 vertical feet of climbing is on loose talus/scree. The gentle summit had a torn-down cairn, so I rebuilt it.

The rebuilt summit cairn atop Peak 9366. Livingston Douglas Photo

The rebuilt summit cairn atop Peak 9366. Livingston Douglas Photo

The scree-and-pine tree summit area of Peak 9366. Livingston Douglas Photo

The scree-and-pine tree summit area of Peak 9366. Livingston Douglas Photo

A timber rattler sunning itself in the pine forest of the South Ridge of Peak 9366. Another one was 2 feet away. Livingston Douglas Photo

A timber rattler sunning itself in the pine forest of the South Ridge of Peak 9366. Another one was 2 feet away. Livingston Douglas Photo

The South Ridge of Peak 9366 as viewed from the sagebrush slope of the lower South Ridge. The summit is right of center. Livingston Douglas Photos

The South Ridge of Peak 9366 as viewed from the sagebrush slope of the lower South Ridge. The summit is right of center. Livingston Douglas Photo

Additional Resources

Mountain Range: Lemhi Range

Longitude: -113.85549   Latitude: 44.65269

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