Peak 9469 (Eidelman Hill) by Livingston Douglas

Elevation: 9,469 ft
Prominence: 369

This peak is not in the book. Published November 2019


Peak 9469 is a bump on the horseshoe-shaped ridge that leads to the summit of Peak 10201/Eidelman Peak. It is a ranked summit and it stands guard over the mouth of Eidelman Canyon. Eidelman Canyon is a dry canyon most of the year. However, it does have its share of elk. I found a shed elk antler in a pine tree (about 4 feet off the ground) in the dense pine forest on the West Ridge. USGS Italian Canyon

Southwest Ridge, Class 2

Date of Climb: August 29, 2019

Access

From the junction of ID-28 and ID-33 in Mud Lake, drive N on ID-28 for 42.5 miles to [signed] Nicholia Road. Nicholia Road is located 6.1 miles N of the Kaufman Picnic Area on ID-28. Turn R/NNE onto Nicholia Road and drive 3.1 miles to an unsigned junction with a dirt road that runs southward at the base of the mountains. Drive 0.9 miles S on the dirt road. Go L/E at an unsigned junction and drive 0.6 miles to the mouth of Eidelman Canyon. Park here (7,180 feet).

The Climb

The toe of the Southwest Ridge is at the mouth of Eidelman Canyon. From the small parking area, scramble E across a short, flat patch of tall sagebrush (with gaps for weaving). Climb up easy, short scrub/grass with a broken rock/gravel base to reach an old mine at a ridge point. There is a large post here. Continue E then ENE up the open ridge crest to Point 8843, a forested, rocky point. Skirt the L/W side of the rocky ridge outcrops located here. The ridge turns L/N and drops to a small saddle.

From the saddle, the ridge is much more rounded and bends R/NE to reach the narrow summit cap. Bushwhack up through a somewhat tedious pine forest with a fair amount of large deadfall to navigate. After 600 vertical feet of climbing from the saddle, you reach the W end of a rocky, narrow (almost knife-edged) summit ridge crest. Scramble across the top of the flat summit blocks then skirt the L/N side of sharper fins/protrusions to reach the open, E end of the ridge crest and the high point. There is a decent cairn atop the summit, thanks to my hard work

West Ridge (Descent), Class 3

Access

Same as for the Southwest Ridge Route

The Descent

If you climbed the rather docile Southwest Ridge, have some excitement on the descent by scrambling down the steep, forested West Ridge. From the summit, return back to the W end of the summit ridge crest. The thick pine forest here destroys any hopes of visuals of the West Ridge. Descend W to find the elusive upper section of the ridge. You soon reach a Class 3 headwall. Move to the R/N and descend ledges in a minor gully to reach the base of the headwall. This requires about 25 feet of down-climbing.

From the base of the headwall (which provides a good visual of the terrain ahead), descend steep talus/scree slopes and enter the forest. Continue W and straight downhill through the dense pine forest. The forest bushwhack includes copious amounts of blowdown as well as some patches of scree. There is brush and sage in open areas. The ridge morphs into a face and then back into a ridge lower down. Just keep heading due W and you’ll be fine. Move L/S as you find necessary to find some open terrain, but be careful to not get lured SW by a spur ridge; it ends with impossible cliff bands.

After a final section of steep, fast descent through the forest, you emerge in a large open field. Descend this easy grass, keeping the forest’s edge just to your R/N. Aim to reach an obvious rocky buttress at the base of the West Ridge. You will find an old mine (and old mining road) here. Hike R/N down the old road to quickly reach the floor of Eidelman Canyon. Follow the Eidelman Canyon jeep road SW down the canyon to reach your parked vehicle at the mouth of the canyon.

Additional Resources

Mountain Range: Beaverhead Range

First Ascent Information:

  •  
  • Other First Ascent: West Ridge —Descent
  • Year: 2019
  • Season: Summer
  • Party: Livingston Douglas

Longitude: 112.94469   Latitude: 44.35319

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