Mount Greylock

Elevation: 9,857 ft
Prominence: 1,037

Climbing and access information for this peak is on Page 131 of the book.


Mount Greylock is just 43 feet shy of 10,000 feet. As I noted in the book, it served as a fire lookout from 1934-1942. As you will see from the accompanying photos, the lookout is no longer habitable. From the summit, there are exceptional views of the Salmon River Mountains, the White Clouds and the Sawtooth Range.

Undoubtedly a trail once led to the summit of this peak, but you would be hard pressed to find much left of it today. The ridgeline east of the Yankee Fork drainage has many unnamed peaks that are worthy hiking goals. You will find wild country interspersed with old and new mining works. You may spot wildlife including elk, deer, mountain goats and wolves. USGS Custer

Mount Greylock from the north.

Mount Greylock as viewed from the north.

I climbed the peak in 2014 with Gilbert Gallegos and Andrew Chiles following the route suggested in the book, which traverses the ridge between Estes Mountain and Greylock. We started at the saddle south of Estes Peak and followed the ridge south to the summit, crossing 2 unnamed peaks on the way.

The following access information updates the entry in the book which is Loon Creek Summit Road [(F)(3.2) on Page 141]. You can access the ridge between Estes Mountain and Mount Greylock via a road that, as far as I know, does not have a Forest Service number designation. I will designate it as the Estes Mining Road. This road leaves Loon Creek Summit Road 5.1 miles north of the beginning of that road.

The Forest Service map and the USGS quad show this road as a jeep trail but it is a well-maintained (albeit steep) road that leads up and over the ridge to the east. Turn right onto this road and drive 2.4 miles to the ridge top where you will find parking and a spot to make a pleasant, dry car camp. From the end of the road to the summit of Greylock, it is roughly 2.2 miles depending upon the line you chose. There are 3 unnamed peaks (Peak 9366, Peak 9381 and Peak 9403) that you can easily add to your itinerary. I have added website entries for each of these peaks.

The ruins of the Greylock Fire Lookout.

The ruins of the Greylock Fire Lookout.

We skirted the 2 intervening peaks on the walk over and then climbed over them on the way back. Here is our GPS track:

My GPS Track.

My GPS Track.

And the roundtrip profile: Greylock GPS profile

The hike starts out through a thick forest.

The hike starts out through a thick forest. Andrew Chiles Photo

The view of the summit from the last saddle to the north.

The view of the summit from the last saddle to the north.

We saw one goat on the climb. Andrew Chiles Photo

We saw one goat on the climb. Andrew Chiles Photo

This may be the reason we only saw one goat. This wolf track was found nearby. Andrew Chiles Photo

This may be the reason we only saw one goat. This wolf track was found nearby. Andrew Chiles Photo

The old lookout may not be habitable but it's still a good place to take a shady break and enjoy the view. Andrew Chiles Photo

The old lookout may not be habitable but it’s still a good place to take a shady break and enjoy the view. Andrew Chiles Photo

There is a large open pit nine just to the west of the peak. It is a huge scar.

There is a large open pit nine just to the west of the peak. It is a huge scar.

Additional Resources

Mountain Range: Salmon River Mountains

Year Climbed: 2014

First Ascent Information:

  • First Ascent Year: 1800
  • Season: Spring
  • Route: Unknown
  • Party: No doubt by Yankee Fork miners.

Longitude: -114.69749   Latitude: 44.419732

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