Peak 10158 (Shadow Peak)

Elevation: 10,158 ft

This peak is not in the book.


Peak 10158 is located on the main Smoky Mountain crest between Peak 10337 and Prairie Creek Peak. Specifically, it is 2.5 miles west northwest of Norton Peak and is found on the Norton Peak USGS Quad. The recommended name is Shadow Peak. Dan Robbins told me about the peak and said “even Rick Baugher has not recorded an ascent on this peak.” Dan suggested that the peak was potentially unclimbed and we did not find evidence of prior climbs. Dan suggested we climb the peak from Prairie Creek and we did it on August 17, 2014. We did a traverse of the peak. We climbed the Peak’s Southeast Rib and descended the headwall between the peak and Point 10092. Both routes will give you a strenuous workout. Both ponds shown on the peak’s east side were dry. The climbing team was Dan Robbins, John Fadgen, Tamara Fadgen, Shadow, their dog, Tom Cox, Steve Weston and me.

Peak 10158 route.

Peak 10158 route.

Total distance was 10.36 miles with an elevation gain of 3,305 feet.

Peak 10158

I am not sure why the GPS which was corrected for elevation shows the wrong figure for the high point but the profile is correct.

Southeast Rib Route. Class 2-3. The ascent route follows Prairie Creek for 3.64 miles and then climbs in a west northwesterly direction up steep grass and tree covered slopes to a rib that climbs up to the crest roughly 2.5 miles south of the summit. The climb up the ridge can made directly with Class 3 moves or indirectly over mostly Class 2 terrain.

The road up Prairie Creek is well graded for its entire 3 mile course.

The road up Prairie Creek is well graded for its entire 3 mile course.

Like the road, the Prairie Creek trail is in good shape.

Like the road, the Prairie Creek trail is in good shape.

Dan Robbins pacing us up the lower slopes of the South West Ridge Route.

Dan Robbins pacing us up the lower slopes of the Southeast Rib Route.

Higher up the route leaves the trees and crosses rock. Dan Robbins ascending.

Higher up the route leaves the trees and crosses rock. Dan Robbins ascending.

The southeast rib rising from the right hand side of the photo. Tom Cox Photo

The southeast rib rising from the right hand side of the photo. Tom Cox Photo

Climbing up the southeast rib. Dan Robbins Photo

Climbing up the southeast rib. Dan Robbins Photo

Looking back down the southeast rib. Tom Cox Photo

Looking back down the southeast rib. Tom Cox Photo

The view torward the summit from the top of the ridge.

The view toward the summit from the top of the ridge.

Crossing the summit ridge. Dan Robbins Photo

Crossing the summit ridge. Dan Robbins Photo

A climber approaching the summit. John Fadgen Photo

A climber approaching the summit. John Fadgen Photo

The happy climbers. Dan Robbins Photo

The happy climbers. Dan Robbins Photo

 Headwall Route. Class 2-3. This route descended north off the summit to the col between the peak and Point 10092. The peak’s north ridge is festooned with several spires that can be bypassed or climbed over. Difficulty of the traverse will depend on your choice of route. It can be done as Class 2 with some difficulty. There are some steep tricky moves either way. If you want to climb this route, leave the trail at 2.55 miles from the trailhead and climb directly up to the drainage. You should find running water a couple of hundred yards above the trail. The water did not reach the trail. We descended on the right side of this stream until the drainage to the Lake 9011 turns off to the west. The creek continues up to the north and does not lead to the dry lake.

Descending down the peak's north ridge. Dan Robbins Photo

Descending down the peak’s north ridge. Dan Robbins Photo

Head to the northern side of the col and then descend down and to the northeast. See Photos below. The headwall is steep and cliffy and a direct descent would be dangerous.

This is a view of the headwall from two thirds of the way down. The descenty gully (shown in the next photo) is just right of center at the top of the headwall.

This is a view of the headwall from two thirds of the way down. The descent gully (shown in the next photo) is just right of center at the top of the headwall.

The descent down the headwall is made possible by this diagonal gully which is probably about 100 feet below the col on its north side. This is the easiest path through the cliffs that cross the top of the headwall.

The descent down the headwall is made possible by this diagonal gully which is probably about 100 feet below the col on its north side. This is the easiest path through the cliffs that cross the top of the headwall.

Tamara is at the top of the gully swing around the rock.  You is at the top of the diagonal gully where you have to swinging around the rock to gain entry.  You can see you and Dan in the upper left. can see you and Dan in the upper left.  John Fadgen Photo

Tamara is at the top of the diagonal gully swinging around a rock at the top of the diagonal gully to gain entry. You can see Tom and Dan in the upper left. John Fadgen Photo

Once you are off the headwall you can descend the steep talus to the lake (dry this year) and then follow the drainage from the lake out to the trail. Choose the route that works best for your temperament.

See Dan Robbins trip report.

See Tom Cox’s trip report.

Mountain Range: Smoky Mountains

Year Climbed: 2014

First Ascent Information:

  • First Ascent Year: 2014
  • Season: Summer
  • Route: Southeast Rib
  • Party: Dan Robbins, John Fadgen, Tamara Fadgen, Tom Cox, Tom Lopez

Longitude: -114.6953   Latitude: 43.7775

Photos:

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