Lick Creek Range

This subrange is coverd in the book on pages 111 to 116.. Lick Creek peaks found on this site significantly expand the books content. All peaks are found at this link: Lick Creek Peaks.


The name Lick Creek Range has not been adopted by the USGS. Nevertheless, many people use it to identify the divide that sits between the North Fork Payette River in the west and the South Fork Salmon River on the east. The northern end of this subrange is bounded by the Warren Wagon Road and the Sesech River. In the south the subrange terminated at the Warm Lake Highway. As such, this group of mountains comprises the largest of the Salmon River Mountains subranges forming an impressive divide about 40 miles long from north to south and more than 20 miles wide at its widest point.

The highest Lick Creek Peaks are clustered at the range’s northern end; at 9,322 feet, North Loon takes the honors as the highest of the bunch. The subrange includes over a hundred unnamed summits which are not in the book. As always, the lack of a name does not mean the peak is not worth climbing. I will continue to add these peaks as I climb them or others provide me with information. This subrange is coverd in the book on pages 111 to 116.. Lick Creek peaks found on this site are found at this link: Lick Creek Peaks

 Squaretop on the left standing proudly above Blackmare Lake. Needles in the far background. The right-hand ridge climbs to the summit of Peak 8494.

Squaretop on the left standing proudly above Blackmare Lake. Needles in the far background. The right-hand ridge climbs to the summit of Peak 8494.

A panorama of one of the Prince Lakes, with McCabe Peak standing tall above it. John Platt Photo

A panorama of one of the Prince Lakes, with McCabe Peak standing tall above it. John Platt Photo

Burnside Peak from Lick Creek Summit.

Burnside Peak from Lick Creek Summit.

The trails in this area vary greatly in their state of maintenance. Unfortunately, many miles of trail have disappeared due to neglect and damage caused by forest fires. Large sections of the subrange have burned over the last 25 years. The fires have opened up the country and the views and crosscountry travel is a bit easier now.

Despite the effects of the recent Forest fires this country is full of wonders, like this pond near Lick Creek Summit. In late August you will also find more huckleberries than you could ever eat.

Despite the effects of the recent Forest fires this country is full of wonders, like this pond near Lick Creek Summit. In late August you will also find more huckleberries than you could ever eat.

In addition to the many peaks in the Lick Creek range there is a lot of good clean granite. Around Needles Peak you can find an array of granite formation that have attracted rock climbers for years and host many bolted routes. Check out the Pins and Needles Climbing Guide for technical climbing routes.

Even more famous, is the formation known as Slick Rock which has provided a proving ground for big wall climbers since the early 70s.

The central Lick Creek crest, east of Payette Lake is rugged and remote. This photo taken from Bearpaw Peak shows the crest from Rainbow Peak to Nick Peak (just to the left andmway in the distance). John Platt Photo

The central Lick Creek crest, east of Payette Lake is rugged and remote. This photo taken from Bearpaw Peak shows the crest from Rainbow Peak to Nick Peak (just to the left andmway in the distance). John Platt Photo

Slick Rock. Ray Brooks Photo

Slick Rock. Ray Brooks Photo

 

Buckhorn Peak.

Buckhorn Peak.

The northern Lick Creek Range viewed from War Eagle Mountain. North and South Loon peaks are on the left. Storm Mountain on the right.

The northern Lick Creek Range viewed from War Eagle Mountain. North and South Loon peaks are on the left. Storm Mountain on the right.

The northern Lick Creek Range viewed from Squaw Point. The Storm Mountain group of peaks are center.

The northern Lick Creek Range viewed from Squaw Point. The Storm Mountain group of peaks are center.

Needles Peak from the southwest. Three of the granite towers on this peak are visible in this photo. There are a large number of one and two pitch routes on these formation many of which were first climbed by Doug Colwell.

Needles Peak from the southwest. Three of the granite towers on this peak are visible in this photo. There are a large number of one and two pitch routes on these formation many of which were first climbed by Doug Colwell.

 

Mountain Range: Western Salmon River Mountains

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