Scott Peak

Elevation: 11,393 ft
Prominence: 4,243

Climbing and access information for Scott Peak is found on page 327. There is a much better route to the summit (see below) than the route listed in the book which I would only recommend as a snow climb when there is no avalance danger.  Updated July 2018


Scott Peak is the highest point in the Idaho portion of the Beaverhead Range and the 55th highest Idaho summit. The summit is located south of Italian Peak and just south of the Continental Divide. Because it has 4,234 feet of prominence it is of special interest to prominence oriented peak baggers. Huhs Horn, Webber Peak and the Clark County High Point are all easily accessed from Scott Peak. Getting to the summit of Scott Peak is the hard part.

The summit of Scott Peak viewed from the top of the Tower Rib. Scott Peak’s summit ridge is nearly a mile long. The southern end of the ridge encompasses Webber Peak and the Clark County High Point.

The summit of Scott Peak viewed from the top of the Tower Rib. Scott Peak’s summit ridge is nearly a mile long. The southern end of the ridge encompasses Webber Peak and the Clark County High Point.

Access

Although the peak has been climbed from the east most climbers will choose to climb the peak from Scott Canyon on the west side. [(B)(8)(a) page 330] The access information in the book is still good. However, a more direct access route was recently signed by the Forest Service and is shown in the map below. Once the road enters Scott Canyon it has some ruts and thus a high clearance vehicle is recommended.

Once at the roads end, the route turns into a Forest Service trail. This trail is at first designated FS-006 until the canyon splits and then FS-081 at an elevation of 7,993 feet. Keep right at this poorly marked junction and follow the trail up to the pass between Scott Canyon and Crooked Creek at 8,975 feet. This trail is easy to follow, flat at first and then steep.

The access information in the book is still good. However, the route shown on this map was signed by the Forest Service amd is a more direct route. This route is 9.0 miles long and gains over a thousand feet.

The access information in the book is still good. However, the route shown on this map was signed by the Forest Service and is a more direct route. This route is 9.0 miles long and gains over a thousand feet.

West Face, Class 2+

This is the route set forth in the book. The route line is shown in John Platt’s photo below. The steep talus on this route is not practical when there is no snow cover.

Scott Peak and West Face Route. John Platt Photo

Scott Peak and West Face Route. John Platt Photo

Tower Rib, Class 2+

The Tower Rib is located on the south side of the peak’s west face. It is distinctive because of two large towers located on its lower third. From the high point of FS-081 leave the trail and traverse east across the gully that empties the west face to the base of the Tower Rib. Climb up the lower rib through a mostly open forest to the base of the small lower tower.

Looking from the trail high point to the Tower Rib with the approximate route in red. Bob Bolton Photo

Looking from the trail high point to the Tower Rib with the approximate route in red. Bob Bolton Photo

This photo shows the two towers and the approximate location of the route.

This photo shows the two towers and the approximate location of the route.

Bypass the lower tower on its west side following goat tracks in places. Aim for the larger tower above staying close to the top of the rib. As you get closer to the upper tower look for a goat track that leads around the northwest base. When the goat track eventually ends climb the steep scree and slabs to the top of the rib above the 10,249 foot tower.

Dean Mollen crossing under the lower tower. Bob Bolton Photo

Dean Molen crossing under the lower tower. Bob Bolton Photo

Bob Bolten traversing under the 10249 tower. Dean Molen photo courtesy of Bob Bolten

Bob Bolten traversing under the 10249 tower. Dean Molen photo courtesy of Bob Bolten

Mike Fox gaining the top of the Tower Rib. The tower is located in the upper left hand corner.

Mike Fox gaining the top of the Tower Rib. The tower is located in the upper left hand corner.

Once above the tower the route is a straight forward slog up the rib. The talus is broken by several steps that can be climbed (Class 3) or bypassed on Class 2 terrain. The talus footing is relatively good considering the steepness of the slope.

Looking down the Tower Rib. The large tower is just left of center. Scott Canyon is right of center at the top of the photo.

Looking down the Tower Rib. The large tower is just left of center. Scott Canyon is right of center at the top of the photo.

Terri Rowe and Mike Fox cresting at the top of the Tower Rib.

Terri Rowe and Mike Fox cresting at the top of the Tower Rib.

At the top of the rib you are on the broad summit ridge. The summit is 2,000 feet to the north and Webber Peak and the Clark County High Point are to the south.

My GPS track for Scott Peak amd Huhs Horn. Round trip 8.8 miles with 4,315 of elevation gain.

My GPS track for Scott Peak amd Huhs Horn. Round trip 8.8 miles with 4,315 of elevation gain.


Check out Rick Baugher’s, John Platt’s, Dan Robbin’s and Larry Prescott’s trip reports which are linked below for other takes on climbing this big peak.

Scott Peak. Dan Robbin's Photo

Scott Peak. Dan Robbin’s Photo

Scott and Weber Peaks viewed from Heart Peak. Larry Prescott

Scott and Weber Peaks viewed from Heart Peak. Larry Prescott

Mountain Range: Beaverhead Range

First Ascent Information:

  • Other First Ascent: First reported Winter ascent
  • Year: 2014
  • Season: Winter
  • Party: Larry Prescott, Kate Hill

Longitude: -112.82119   Latitude: 44.35379

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